Dear Valued Clients and Visitors: As our nation responds to COVID-19, our firm is taking precautionary measures by closely following and reinforcing the guidelines from the CDC and local health authorities. Our physical office is open on a intermittent basis. However, please be assured that we are open for business and ready to serve your needs.

If you have a tax problem or inquiry please call and if we are not in leave a message. A return phone call will be made within a short period of time. Now is the time to address your tax matter. We remain committed to our clients and colleagues through these unusual times. Please stay safe and healthy.

Law Offices of Robert T. Leonard, APC
Free Consultations Available
Toll Free 888-408-9486

Finding Real Life Solutions To Your Tax Problem

IRS to change its asset foreclosure procedures

| Jun 16, 2016 | Uncategorized |

People usually can’t imagine the feeling of being robbed.  Who can really understand the sense of despair, helplessness and being violated that comes after your personal space is invaded and your belonging are taken. Unfortunately, a number of taxpayers have experienced this feeling; not because their homes were broken into, but because the IRS seized their property through civil and criminal asset foreclosures.

Indeed, the federal government has broad and vast power to collect on past due and unpaid taxes. However, taxpayers have rights and may challenge the government’s actions and have their property returned. 

In fact, congressional hearings were recently held to discuss how the IRS, under the guise of investigating crimes, may have stolen money and property from innocent Americans. An accountingtoday.com report indicates that the IRS wrongfully took $43 million from 618 people between 2007 and 2013, even when there was no indication of criminal activity. However, in October 2014, the IRS indicated that it would change its seizure policy.

In the meantime, those who lost their property are still having a difficult time recovering their property. Through the hearings, legislators voiced their frustrations with how long it has taken for taxpayers to receive what they lost. Nevertheless, the work in contacting Congress has resulted in new policies that will save taxpayers from having to spend money on legal counsel to recover property that should not have been taken in the first place.

If you have questions about administrative or criminal proceedings involving asset foreclosures, an experienced tax attorney can help. 

Categories

Archives

Send Us A Quick Message